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How Maine’s congressional representatives voted this week — Politics — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine

How Maine’s congressional representatives voted this week — Politics — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine

Together with roll name votes this week, the Senate additionally handed a decision (S. Res. 19), expressing the sense of the Senate that disqualifying a nominee to federal workplace on the idea of membership within the Knights of Columbus violates the Structure of america; and handed the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Requirements Program Extension Act (H.R. 251), to increase by 15 months the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Requirements Program of the Division of Homeland Safety.

The Home additionally handed the Additional Further Persevering with Appropriations Act (H.J. Res. 28), making additional persevering with appropriations for fiscal yr 2019; the TANF Extension Act (H.R. 430), to increase this system of block grants to States for short-term help for needy households and associated packages by means of June 30, 2019; the Federal Intern Safety Act (H.R. 136), to amend title 5, United States Code, to guard unpaid interns within the Federal Authorities from office harassment and discrimination; and the All-American Flag Act (H.R. 113), to require the acquisition of domestically made flags of the USA of America to be used by the Federal Authorities.

Home votes

Home Vote 1:
FUNDING EPA, INTERIOR DEPARTMENT: The Home has handed the Division of the Inside, Surroundings, and Associated Businesses Appropriations Act (H.R. 266), sponsored by Rep. Betty McCollum, D-Minnesota. The invoice would offer fiscal 2019 funding for the Inside Division, Environmental Safety Company, and numerous different cultural and environmental businesses. McCollum stated the lapse in funding in the course of the partial authorities shutdown “places the health of the American people and their communities in jeopardy” by halting EPA funding, and the invoice would finish that menace. An opponent, Rep. Ken Calvert, R-California, stated the invoice didn’t adequately fund key EPA environmental enchancment packages and wholesome forest and earthquake early warning initiatives at Inside. The vote, on Jan. 11, was 240 yeas to 179 nays.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

Home Vote 2:
WORKER PAY AND GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: The Home has handed the Authorities Worker Truthful Remedy Act (S. 24), sponsored by Sen. Benjamin Cardin, D-Maryland, to offer compensation for federal authorities staff affected by the partial authorities shutdown that started on Dec. 22. A supporter, Rep. Greg Gianforte, R-Montana, stated it fulfilled a “promise to our dedicated civil servants, both those forced to the sidelines and those still hard at work without pay” because of the failure of politicians to avert or resolve the shutdown. The vote, on Jan. 11, was 411 yeas to 7 nays.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

Home Vote three:
ANTI-SEMITISM ENVOY: The Home has handed the Particular Envoy to Monitor and Fight Anti-Semitism Act (H.R. 221), sponsored by Rep. Christopher Smith, R-New Jersey, to provide the rank of ambassador for the particular envoy on the State Division who’s liable for monitoring and combating anti-Semitism in overseas nations. Smith stated giving the envoy a better standing “upgrades and strengthens the position to better anticipate, prevent, mitigate, and respond to threats against Jewish communities worldwide.” The vote, on Jan. 11, was 411 yeas to 1 nay.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

Home Vote four:
SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT: The Home has handed the Investing in Principal Road Act (H.R. 116), sponsored by Rep. Judy Chu, D-California, to extend the share of capital that banks can spend money on companies which are participating within the Small Enterprise Funding Firm program. Chu stated this system has helped small companies, together with Apple, Intel, and Costco, and increasing funding within the companies beneath this system “means more entrepreneurs will be able to access the capital they need to grow their businesses and hire their workers.” The vote, on Jan. 14, was 403 yeas to 2 nays.
NOT VOTING: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

Home Vote 5:
PARTIAL GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: The Home has rejected the Additional Further Persevering with Appropriations Act (H.J. Res. 27), sponsored by Rep. Nita M. Lowey, D-New York. The invoice would have offered funding via Feb. 1 for the varied federal authorities businesses whose funding has lapsed because of the partial shutdown. Lowey stated it aimed to offer “time for Congress to come to a full-year agreement without further jeopardizing vital services or the pay of federal workers.” An opponent, Rep. Robert B. Aderholt, R-Alaska, stated a short-term funding invoice would go away the essential price range deadlock between Democrats and Republicans unresolved, and Aderholt referred to as for negotiations to develop a everlasting answer for fiscal 2019 funding. The vote, on Jan. 15, was 237 yeas to 187 nays, with a two-thirds majority required for approval.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

Home Vote 6:
WHITE NATIONALISM AND WHITE SUPREMACY: The Home has handed a decision (H. Res. 41), sponsored by Rep. James E. Clyburn, D-South Carolina, stating that the Home rejects white nationalism and white supremacy as hateful expressions of intolerance which might be contradictory to the values that outline the individuals of america. Clyburn stated: “Racial divisiveness is a fault line that is ripping our nation apart. This body must speak out against this evil.” The vote, on Jan. 15, was 424 yeas to 1 nay.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

Home Vote 7:
DISCRIMINATION AND FEDERAL WORKFORCE: The Home has handed the Federal Worker Antidiscrimination Act (H.R. 135), sponsored by Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, D-Maryland, to extend discrimination and supervisor retaliation protections for federal staff. Cummings stated the invoice will “protect the right of every single federal employee, every federal job applicant, and indeed of every citizen, to equality of opportunity.” The vote, on Jan. 15, was unanimous with 424 yeas.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

Home Vote eight:
GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING: The Home has handed the Increasing Contracting Alternatives for Small Companies Act (H.R. 190), sponsored by Rep. Roger W. Marshall, R-Kansas, to extend the greenback quantity of sole supply contracting awards which might be issued to small companies by the federal authorities. Marshall stated the change would improve alternatives for the small companies to win federal contracts whereas additionally strengthening oversight of the contracting course of. The vote, on Jan. 16, was 415 yeas to six nays.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

Home Vote 9:
BORDER SECURITY: The Home has handed an modification sponsored by Rep. James P. McGovern, D-Massachusetts, to the Supplemental Appropriations Act (H.R. 268). The modification would block the invoice from getting used to fund the development of limitations on the U.S.-Mexico border by the Military Corps of Engineers or Homeland Safety Division. McGovern stated the modification was wanted to make sure that the invoice’s intent of utilizing cash for catastrophe aid was not used for an additional function. An opponent, Rep. Kay Granger, R-Texas, referred to as it a “poison pill” that distracted from the bipartisan effort to legislate measures that may “bring our infrastructure and agency assets back to full operation” following current disasters. The vote, on Jan. 16, was 230 yeas to 197 nays.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

Home Vote 10:
RECOVERY FROM NATURAL DISASTERS: The Home has handed the Supplemental Appropriations Act (H.R. 268), sponsored by Rep. Nita M. Lowey, D-New York. The invoice would offer $12.1 billion of supplemental funding in fiscal 2019 for federal emergency spending on restoration from current wildfires, hurricanes, and different pure disasters, and supply funding for the varied federal businesses whose funding has lapsed because of the partial authorities shutdown. Lowey stated the restoration funding “helps meet the urgent needs of our fellow Americans affected by recent national disasters.” An opponent, Rep. Kay Granger, R-Texas, stated the invoice’s lack of “funding for border security needs identified by the agents and officers on the front lines” meant it might correctly be rejected by the Senate. The vote, on Jan. 16, was 237 yeas to 187 nays.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

Home Vote 11:
STANDARDS FOR GOVERNMENT GRANTS: The Home has handed the Grant Reporting Effectivity and Agreements Transparency Act (H.R. 150), sponsored by Rep. Virginia Foxx, R-North Carolina, to require the Workplace of Administration and Finances to concern government-wide requirements for gathering and making publicly out there info disclosed by recipients of federal grants. Foxx stated adopting the requirements “will alleviate compliance burdens; provide instant insights for grantor agencies and Congress; and enable easy access to data for oversight, analytics, and program evaluation.” The vote, on Jan. 17, was unanimous with 422 yeas.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

Home Vote 12:
RUSSIA BUSINESS SANCTIONS: The Home has handed a decision (H.J. Res. 30), sponsored by Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Maryland, that may disapprove of a Trump administration plan to finish sanctions towards Russian aluminum companies related to Oleg Deripaska, a businessman sanctioned by the U.S. who has been linked to Russian President Vladimir Putin. Hoyer stated the decision “will force the Treasury Department to engage more thoroughly with Congress on explaining its actions on this deal and to seek a better one.” The vote, on Jan. 17, was 362 yeas to 53 nays.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

Senate votes

Senate Vote 1:
RUSSIA BUSINESS SANCTIONS: The Senate has rejected a cloture movement to finish debate on a decision (S.J. Res. 2), sponsored by Senate Minority Chief Chuck Schumer, D-New York. The decision would have disapproved of a Trump administration plan to finish sanctions towards Russian aluminum companies related to Oleg Deripaska, a businessman sanctioned by the U.S. who has been linked to Russian President Vladimir Putin. Schumer stated the disapproval was wanted to take care of “a tough line on Putin” in mild of what he referred to as a “shamefully and suspiciously weak on President Putin” strategy by the administration. A decision opponent, Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, stated the administration’s plan “appropriately reflects how U.S. sanctions policy uses smart sanctions to change the behavior of those sanctioned to build pressure behind the ultimate goals of U.S. policy toward Putin’s Russia.” The vote, on Jan. 16, was 57 yeas to 42 nays, with a three-fifths majority required to finish debate.
YEAS: Collins R-Maine, King I-Maine

Senate Vote 2:
ABORTION FUNDING: The Senate has rejected a cloture movement to finish debate on the movement to think about the No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion and Abortion Insurance coverage Full Disclosure Act (S. 109), sponsored by Sen. Roger F. Wicker, R-Mississippi. The invoice would block federal authorities funds from getting used for abortion or for medical insurance plans that embrace abortion protection, with exceptions for abortions associated to rape, incest, or preserving the lifetime of the mom. A supporter, Sen. Steve Daines, R-Montana, stated: “We must stand to protect the most vulnerable in our society, and that includes the unborn.” The vote, on Jan. 17, was 48 yeas to 47 nays, with a three-fifths majority wanted to finish debate.
NAYS: Collins R-Maine, King I-Maine